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So….

Where has all this introductory ‘So’ stuff come from?

I seem to be hearing ‘so’ used as the first word in responses by interviewees to questions put by journalists more and more frequently. It reached a peak in a recent interview with Cressida Dick, the new London Metropolitan Police Commissioner on the BBC Today program on 18th April 2017 Hear it here…scroll through 2 hours 13 minutes into the program.

After a while I found myself listening so carefully in anticipation of the next ‘so’ that I lost much of what she was actually saying.

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Brexit (noun)

British exit from the European Union ….utterances of which sends little Europeaners into paroxysms of rage. To the Brimoaners and Bremainers just what is it about the referendum question we w…

Source: Brexit (noun)

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British exit from the European Union

….utterances of which sends little Europeaners into paroxysms of rage.

To the Brimoaners and Bremainers just what is it about the referendum question we were all asked is so difficult to understand. Just to remind you

Should the United Kingdom remain a member of the European Union or leave the European Union?

That’s it, plain and simple. No caveats, no qualifications.

The referendum result was to leave the European Union. In anyone else’s lexicon the word ‘leave’ is clear, unremarkable and whose meaning is self evident. Yet ever since June 23rd last year we’ve had a constant backlash from the left with all sorts of assertions that leave doesn’t also mean leave the single market or tariff free zone.

Well yes, actually it does. As has been succinctly remarked on many occasions, leave means leave – no ifs or buts.

I’m getting somewhat tired of the patronising self assured elite who think the rest of us were either misled or are stupid and don’t really understand what we’ve done.

Well get over it. We knew leave meant leave both the single market and tariff free zone. We knew that this would allow us to start from a blank slate and negotiate whatever deals and arrangements we wanted without all the baggage that would otherwise fetter us. All the talk at the time about negotiating a Norwegian or Swiss type arrangement was an irrelevant red herring, cynically brought up in an attempt to sow seeds of doubt.

With the High Court decision over who can trigger Article 50 now behind us the way forward is relatively straightforward. The government’s argument that no deal (on access to the single market) is better than a bad deal should be the watchword.

The one thing that has surprised me is the way the word has resonated around the world. It clearly seems to have echoes in other countries where people are starting to sit up and recognise something can actually be done to rein in the overbearing global elite who feel it’s their right to rule without actually noticing what their electorates want.

Shakespeare put it best – “The game’s afoot”

Vive le Brexit.

 

 

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The sheer hubris of la Sturgeon beggars belief. So the SNP are to table 50 amendments to the Brexit article 50 Bill when it comes before the UK Parliament. Why stop at 50 and why such a round number? Why not 60, or 99 for that matter.

It’s hard to see how the short two line Bill that seems likely could possibly give rise to 50 amendments. There’s likely to be less than 50 words in the whole Bill.  I exaggerate to make the point that you can only amend what’s written.

Of course this is simply her way to shore up support amongst her falling SNP support at home and little to do with any real hope of success. She needs to be careful. I sense that there are many who are getting fed up at her strident and overbearing manner. Who does she think she is?

I’m coming around to the conclusion that P.M. Theresa May should call la Sturgeon’s bluff and say to her, ‘You know what, we know you’ll fail but we agree you should have another referendum on Scottish Independence and we’ll be introducing a Bill to set one up shortly.’, and then do it. Let’s lance the boil. There’s not a cat in hell’s chance she’d get anywhere near a majority given the Scottish deficit as a % of GDP is now over twice that of the whole UK. Which of course would be even more when income from the Barnet formula was lost on independence day.

 

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Trident missile test.

I see the usual suspects on the left are signalling outrage that a failure of a Trident missile after launch from a British submarine on a US test range wasn’t reported to Parliament. Of cour…

Source: Trident missile test.

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I see the usual suspects on the left are signalling outrage that a failure of a Trident missile after launch from a British submarine on a US test range wasn’t reported to Parliament. Of course it wasn’t, nor should it.

The completely synthetic rage is predicated on the fact that when tests are successful then these are announced and therefore by the same token so too should unsuccessful tests.

The twitterati and those Labour Party socialists who object to the whole notion of nuclear missiles completely miss the point. The whole point about defence systems is that the knowledge that they exist and are succesfully tested is in itself a deterrent. So of course successful tests are announced from time to time (but I doubt all the time), but what’s the sense in announcing to your enemies that there has been a problem.

Does Russia announce that the record tractor production or harvest yields of previous years has suffered a setback this year. Of course not for very good reasons. In the case of Russia because they need to keep the population feeling happy about the ruling regime. It’s exactly the same in not wanting to give succour to your enemies in announcing a failed test, thereby increasing the chances of a miscalculation and an aggressive action by them.

 

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I have been appalled at some of the language and bile that’s been pouring out of the twitterati and elsewhere. One thing it is not is British as I have always understood the meaning of that term. I’m upset that many young people are blaming their parent’s post war generation on the sole grounds that we don’t have as long to live and be as affected by the result as they will, and as if we too don’t have the same concerns for the future of our grandchildren and genuinely believe we are better off out, just as much as they believe we would be better off in.

I was particularly incensed by the article by Giles Coren in the UK’s Times  on  Saturday. (see below). I shudder to think what his celebrated and genuinely funny and decent father would have thought. It’s so full of bile and hate that I was astounded and expected better from him. I thought I’d see what he was writing on the twittersphere and just couldn’t believe the foul language, and equally surprising were many similar comments full of hatred from his followers. Metropolitan London are quick to cry hate crime elsewhere. They need to seriously look at the motes in their own eyes and be careful the boys in blue don’t start calling.

The Giles Coren Article. Times UK – Saturday 25 June 2016

I had lunch with my mother on Wednesday and as our starters were being cleared away she turned to me and said, “So, Giles, how are you going to vote tomorrow?”

And I replied, “why?” because I sniffed a trap. I’m not saying my mother loves a lunchtime broigus, it’s just that she doesn’t usually ask a question unless she already has a strong opinion of her own fired up and ready to go.

On this, I was guessing she was for Brexit. My mother was (and remains) a great admirer of Margaret Thatcher, almost always votes Conservative, has an abhorrence of bureaucracy and red tape thanks to 40 years working in the NHS (and owning a house in France) and voted to leave the EEC in 1975.

And so her answer astonished me.

“I’m asking because whatever you vote, I’ll vote,” she said. “After all, I’m going to be dead soon so it doesn’t matter what I think. I won’t be affected.”

If only every older person in Britain had had the humility to think the same way this week and pass on their vote to a generation more likely to be affected by the result. We’d still be in Europe this morning. We’d be laughing at how ridiculous it was to have had a referendum in the first place and just getting on with our lives.

For make no mistake, it is the old people who did this to us. I assume you have seen the voting breakdown by age? In the 18-24 group it was 64 per cent to Remain and 24 per cent to Leave. In the 25-49 age group it was 45 per cent to 39. Only in the 50-64 bracket does the balance shift, going over to 49 per cent for Leave, as against 35 for Remain. And then among the over-65s it was an astonishing 58 per cent for Leave, against 33 per cent for Remain.

The less time a person had left on earth to live and face up to their decision, in other words, the more likely they were to vote to leave the European Union.

The wrinkly bastards stitched us young ’uns up good and proper on Thursday. From their stair lifts and their Zimmer frames, their electric recliner beds and their walk-in baths, they reached out with their wizened old writing hands to make their wobbly crosses and screwed their children and their children’s children for a thousand generations. (Except my mother — who wants it made clear that she was for Leave anyway.)

I always knew it would turn out this way. From the moment the referendum was called, the polls showed a massive majority for Leave in the over-65 group — bigger than any differential in wage, education, geographical location or political leaning. And it was how I formed my eventual decision to vote Remain. I just knew that I could not vote with the old people. Because old people are always wrong. About everything.

Take global warming, for example. In all opinion surveys that I have seen, belief in anthropogenic global warming declines every year after the age of 25. In other words, the likelihood of a person accepting the truth of global warming is inversely proportional to the likelihood of their being alive to see its disastrous effects. Is it because people become more stupid with age? I wouldn’t presume to say so. Although obviously Nigel Lawson has. But mainly it’s just that they give less and less of a damn what happens to the rest of us as time goes on.

The older people get, the more they think they have earned the right to do and think whatever they damn well please. And this leads to their being wrong. About everything. Not just about elasticated waistbands, brightly coloured outerwear, fluffy little pale blue hairdos, big chunky spectacles, beige trousers, Countdown and young people today. About everything.

Older people care less and less what happens to the rest of us

Take recycling. Old people never recycle anything. They think it’s all mumbo jumbo. And why should they bother? After all, by the time that bottle of milk stout is crushed, melted and made into another bottle of milk stout, they’ll be far too dead to enjoy it. They can’t work the TV, they can’t hear their mobile phone or answer it if they do hear it, they don’t understand the self-checkout at the supermarket or why there aren’t price tags on things anymore …

And then of course there is immigration. A report for the World Bank in 2012 found that, “It is old people everywhere who oppose immigration the most, across the board. In every country for which we have data (except Sweden) older natives disproportionately oppose immigration, regardless of income, education and employment status.”

And that is despite the fact that it is old people who benefit most from immigration, seeing as they no longer compete in the labour market and require, or will soon require, the sort of care that is made cheaper by immigrant labour. But, oh no, old people are against immigration because, well, because they are wrong about everything.

Should they have been allowed to vote in this referendum? I’m not sure that they should have been. A general election, yes. Everyone should get a say on what happens over the next five years. But over the next 50? I don’t think so. Not if you’re not going to be there to face it.

And don’t go telling me that we owe at least a debt of respect to the elderly. Respect for what? Don’t confuse the elderly of today with the elderly of the recent past. This lot did not fight a war (not many of them). They didn’t free us from the yoke of tyranny. They didn’t live in modesty and hardship and hunger so that future generations might thrive. They just enjoyed high employment, good pay, fat benefits, enormous pension privileges, international travel, the birth of pop music and lashings of free sex. We don’t owe them a thing. We should cut them off. Rewrite the franchise to start at 16 and end at 60 and do this thing all over again.

We won’t, of course. So we will be compelled to make our strength of feeling felt in smaller, subtler ways. In fact it is already happening. As early as lunchtime on Friday, Twitter was showing 15,000 retweets of what may come to be the standout mantra for Brexit 2016:

“I’m never giving up my seat on the train for an old person again.”

The Times

 

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